Adrenals – Chronic Fatigue

updated Article

Our body has a hormonal rhythm of cortisol that varies depending on the time of day. Too much cortisol, and we feel wired and tired. Too little cortisol, and we feel low energy and listless.
Under acute stress, our body produces more cortisol to help us get through an acute stage of stress. If the stressor persists, our adrenals continue to output extra cortisol. The problem with prolonged cortisol output is that it creates insulin resistance. You won’t become diabetic necessarily; but you will begin to gain fat, especially around the middle, and you will start to feel more tired after a carbohydrate containing meal. Some people feel so sleepy after eating carbohydrates that they have to take a nap!

Depending upon what time of day our cortisol stays high, we can suffer cravings for sweets in an effort to boost our low energy, followed by fatigue. Some turn to coffee to boost their energy, only to exhaust their adrenals eventually as the adrenals begin to fail to respond to the caffeine stimulus.
The flip side begins to occur as the adrenals become fatigued and less cortisol output occurs during certain parts of the day. During those low cortisol episodes, we experience trouble with maintaining our blood sugars. We might not be hungry in the morning and/or can’t fall asleep without eating before bed!  Low cortisol values also contribute to a weakened immune system, allowing low-grade infections to become chronic.

How Can I Know If  My Cortisol Is Off?

The best way to determine where your cortisol values are during the day is to do a saliva test. There is a cortisol saliva test available at the online store at www.ImmuneMatrix.com that includes a practitioner’s consult on the findings. It takes two weeks to get the test results. Knowing what time of day one’s cortisol is high and/or low (it can be both high and low in a day), is essential for boosting one’s immune system function, improving one’s blood sugar regulation and optimizing one’s energy in a natural manner.

cortisol – cortisol level

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Information on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use the information on this site for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment.

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Anna Manayan

Anna Manayan