The Best Water

February 19, 2013
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Can you gauge whether you are drinking enough water based upon whether you are thirsty or not? Absolutely not. In fact, by the time you are thirsty your body is already dehydrated. A case in point involves a 70 year old woman who was in good health, walked 45 minutes daily and ended up in the emergency room with heart palpitations, dizziness and weakness. Obviously the doctors suspected heart attack or some other cardiovascular problems. It turned out to be dehydration, and it was in the cool of the fall weather!

Her doctors put her on an i.v. to hydrate her and sent her home with instructions to “drink more water”. I spoke to her about this and she said she didn’t pay much attention to drinking water, didn’t know what her doctor’s meant and didn’t notice being thirsty before she began having these symptoms. She was quite shocked that she was dehydrated. She was never advised by her doctors that you cannot determine whether your body has enough water by whether or not you feel thirsty. She was surprised by my informing her of that especially since she said that she never felt thirsty and just woke up very dizzy that morning, very exhausted and started having heart palpitations. Dehydration, to various degrees, can happen to anyone of any age when one does not drink sufficient amounts of water especially when one is mineral deficient.

Let’s first talk about the amount of water we should be drinking, as we all fall short. A general rule of thumb is to drink half your weight in ounces. For example, a 100lb person needs to drink 50 ounces of water a day. You need to add more if you sweat from heat or from exercise.

Insufficient hydration slows down all metabolic processes in the body including brain focus and energy. Dehydration is the number one cause for fatigue and hunger! It is said that if you are hungry and it’s between meals, first try drinking a glass of water as sometimes hunger is the body’s way of signaling you need more fluids.

Of course not having enough fluids also makes your blood thicker. The heart has to work harder. Thus dehydration, even minor, pre-disposes you to blood clots, cardiovascular events such as heart attack and toxic re-absorption. Your liver furthermore needs to have toxins diluted to a sufficient amount to allow the colon and kidneys to excrete them. Think of dehydration like a river drying up. The water in the river moves more slowly, as will your blood circulation and the river will become stagnant and polluted, as will your blood!

Some people object to drinking water because they say they have to urinate soon after drinking it. If so, that is a sign that you are mineral deficient. Your body cannot adequately use water without the osmotic benefit of minerals, especially alkaline minerals such as:

  • magnesium
  • manganese
  • selenium
  • molybdenum
  • zinc
  • copper and other essential trace minerals.

In addition, fertilizers used on both organic and regular agricultural farming inhibit the uptake of magnesium and other trace minerals making the very vegetables we eat in this day and age deficient in alkaline minerals.

Compound the fact our food is deficient in minerals, refined carbohydrates (food from a box in general) causes us to need more alkaline minerals, as does our liver to process toxins, to keep up with detoxification from our toxic world! Thus nearly everyone is alkaline mineral deficient. This prevents us from being able to alkalinize our bodies, making us more prone to bacterial, fungal and viral infections of a chronic nature due to our acid terrain!

What is the solution? Drink alkaline water between meals half your weight in ounces. What is alkaline water? Use a water ionizer to a ph as high as you can take it. Start slow at 7ph and work up to 9.5 slowly as going too fast can cause detoxification reactions. You can also add trace mineral drops to your water. Use ph test strips that you buy from a local pet store used in aquariums.

Immune Matrix has their patients use several different types of electrolytes, and alkaline mineral drops. Their patients have reported reduced herpes outbreaks, improved energy and brain clarity as they are better able to become more alkaline.

Do you have to worry about taking in too many alkaline minerals? I have not seen a case yet since most people have a fair amount of toxic retention of metals, microbial metabolites and thus are mineral deficient. Will magnesium alone be sufficient? No. Our body and the liver in particular, needs magnesium akin to white flour in a cookie recipe to detoxify. However, other trace minerals function as catalysts in the methylation/liver detoxification process that are equally important. Therefore, if you are focusing only on magnesium, you could very well be zinc and trace mineral and B vitamin deficient also. Therefore, I recommend you take a balanced magnesium such as Magneleuvers as well as trace minerals in all the water you drink.

If the taste of water puts you off, you can add electrolytes in the form that slightly naturally flavors the water and adds great essential minerals to the body. Immune Matrix patients love the lemon or lime flavor of  PureLyte electrolytes. One can make a healthy carbonated beverage with it also by adding it to sparking mineral water.

Last but not least make sure your water is filtered to remove fluoride if your city adds it or chloramine, another additive that is removed by certain filters. Also make sure that your water does not come out of a plastic bottle. Make it a point to use a glass water bottle, and stop drinking out of plastic bottles this year! So in conclusion, add trace minerals to your alkaline water and make a conscious effort to become aware of your fluid intake. Your body, especially your liver and brain will be happier for it!

Please note:

Information on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use the information on this site for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment.

 

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Anna Manayan

Anna Manayan