IMPROVE DIGESTION and TOXIC ELIMINATION WITH BETTER GALLBLADDER FUNCTION

Your gallbladder holds bile for release to help digest fats from your diet as well as to move toxins bound by the liver for elimination by the colon. Slow or low bile flow means slow digestion of fats and even slower elimination of toxins!

Even if you are avoiding the “bad fats” such as:

  • saturated fats in meat
  • chicken skin
  • dairy
  • coconut and palm oils
  • trans fats in the form of hydrogenated additives, sneak into your food when you buy processed food.

Good fats from olive oil, nuts, salmon and avocado are still needed to reduce inflammation, repair your arteries and veins, and to keep tryglycerides down. Without sufficient bile you cannot break down and use these good fats, even with sufficient pancreatic and fat digestive enzymes in the form of lipase.

If you have had your gallbladder removed, your liver continues to make bile. However, you are unable to concentrate it sufficiently to allow a big enough dose of bile to be released when you eat fats. Therefore, you are told not to eat fats. However, your body still needs good fats. In fact many doctors have told patients not to even take the essential omega 3 supplements! You can and should take fish oils without a gallbladder you simply need additional bile support.

If you have been told you have gallstones then it’s a sign of slow bile function and you need bile support. You don’t have a sick gallbladder because you have gallstones; you have gallstones because your bile flow is slow and this is endangering your gallbladder. Removing your gallbladder will not solve the problem of low bile function so take heed now while you still have a gallbladder.

Other signs of low bile function and slow bile movement are lack of appetite in the morning that accompanies nausea, which can get worse if you force yourself to eat. When bile moves slowly so does digestion. You can have nausea and a feeling of digestive stagnation and/or indigestion, stomach cramps, and even bloating as a result.

Why does slow bile flow cause itchy skin? Bile acids will enter into the bloodstream and the lymphatics where the acids are concentrated in the skin. These bile acids are very irritating to the skin and itching results. In addition, you may find that no matter how much you eat oils, or put them on your skin, your skin remains perpetually very dry! With low bile function you cannot absorb the fats to repair and moisten skin.

Examine your stools and check to see if you see oil droplets in the water. This is a sign that fats are passing right through your system undigested.

Unfortunately Western medicine takes a casual approach to the gallbladder feeling that what God intended you to have, they as doctors can so easily and casually remove without consequence. Therefore, nothing is done in Western medicine to really reverse the cause for why someone develops gallstones, or to increase bile output or flow.

Taking digestive enzymes that contain lipase to help break down fats is essential but sometimes not sufficient. Supplements that contain phosphotidyl choline help to prevent gallstones by emulsifying cholesterol. Milk thistle not only helps the liver but will assist bile flow, as does inositol. Taking in sufficient magnesium and vitamin C as well as taurine will help your body metabolize bile acids and prevent their build up in your skin and crystallization in the gallbladder. Many gallbladder support supplements will contain these essentials in addition to pancreatic enzymes and/or betain HCL to improve digestion of food. Consult with your health care provider for the best supplementation that your body needs to improve bile flow and function. Don’t wait until your doctor tells you to remove your gallbladder. Find a good alternative medical practitioner knowledgeable in treating digestive disorders and with experience in resolving gallstones and saving gallbladders! They are out there and you can improve your digestion.

Please note:
Information on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use the information on this site for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment.

 

Incoming search terms for the article:

Anna Manayan

Anna Manayan