HOW DOES ACIDITY IMPACT CHRONIC FATIGUE?

2010/03/01
Published

When we talk of someone being acidic, we are talking about have a lower than optimum ph balance of lymphatic and digestive fluids in the body. The body draws minerals from the tissue to maintain blood ph at its optimum ph of 7.35 and it will do all that it can as a priority to maintain adequate blood ph to protect the brain at all costs. However, as a result, our salivary and digestive fluids and lymphatic and tissue and excretory fluids can become acid as a result.
 
A urine or salivary ph of 6.4 taken about 2 hrs after eating would be a good range to shoot for. Below that number you are considered acidic. Enzymes made in the body function at a narrow ph range. Enzymes are needed for digestion and to stimulate over 40,000 chemical processes in the body! When the pH of your body becomes acidic, you inactivate these pH sensitive enzymes. The same is true for hormones. Therefore, your body could be making enough enzymes and hormones but because you are acidic, their effectiveness is impaired. The result is an inefficient digestive system, inefficient metabolism and decrease hormone function. And you feel like you are trying to drive your car in D2!
 
Long term acidity causes demineralization of the bones and tissues as the blood seeks first priority to maintain proper pH. This is why those diagnosed with osteoporosis or osteopenia are told to avoid eating lots of beef and other high acid foods. The American diet is an acidic diet! High in animal protein and low in dark green leafy vegetables full of minerals to counter the acid in animal protein.
 
Acidity also puts out the welcom mat inviting bacteria, virus, yeast and fungi to take a foothold in the body. Its an enviroment that makes it easy for them to live in. This another reason why cancer is seen more often in those that are acidic. Having multiple low grade bacteria infections in our gums, and digestive tract, often without our knowledge drains our immune system and our energy. Chronic low grade fungal and yeast infections in our digestive tract and even our tissues also drains our immune system and causes fatigue.
 
In summary, being acidic contributes to lowered energy reserves because:
1) we loose minerals from the body needed to facilitate the proper metabolic processes in the body
2) enzymes are less efficient for digestion and other metabolic processes
3) hormones become ineffective in acid terrains
4) bacteria, yeast, fungi, virus all love the acid terrain
 
HOW CAN WE RESTORE OUR PH?
All changes in life start with one step in the right direction. It takes 6 weeks to develop a new habit so be gentle on yourself when trying to make lifestyle changes. Write down all the factors that are contributing to your becoming acidic, see how many below apply:
-chronic stress
-sleeping less than 6 hrs a day
-drinking even one cup of coffee, late per day
-smoking
-eating animal protein
-not eating dark green leafy vegetables daily
-drinking orange juice
-eating refined carbohydrates
-eating sugars
-eating high glycemic fruits
-eating no vegetables
-drinking canned sodas
-eating canned food
 
Start by eliminating one thing a week. If you drink 4 sodas in a day, begin by cutting back one soda per day until you can switch from a high acid soda like Cola to a mineral water instead. Get one “bad” habit under control before adding another so that you don’t become frustrated or feel overwhelmed.
 
You can also begin adding more alkalanizing foods, eating more vegetables, and taking in a green drink daily!
 
Please note that citrus foods such as lemon and lime are acidic before they ingested.  But their byproducts that they leave in the body are alkaline.                                                                              

Acidic Foods: Bacon, Pork, Beef, Lobster, Chicken, Turkey, Lamb, Veal, Rice, Oats, Walnuts, Wheat, Pecans, Salmon, Shrimp, Butter, Milk, Cheese, Beans

Alkaline Foods: Avocado, Garlic, Beets, Broccoli, Carrots, Asparagus, Potatoes, Spinach, Onions, Tomatoes, Kale, Apples, Apricots, Bananas, Peas, Peaches, Pears, Prunes, Berries, Spirulina, Cherries, Pumpkin, Lettuce,  Root vegetables,  Cabbage,  Celery                                                                                                            

Please note:
Information on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use the information on this site for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment.

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Anna Manayan

Anna Manayan